Home

   Log in or Register


Insurance Quotes
forums Campsite Search Comp Directory tips virtual brochure Profile
Tent and Awning Reviews Competitions Caravans and Motorhomes For Sale Shopping Diary Contact Us


Index : General Articles : Do Camping Kids do Better at School? - by UKCampsite.co.uk

Choose another section:  

Do Camping Kids do Better at School?

Children who camp in the great outdoors at least once a year go on to do better at school, as well as being healthier and happier, according to their parents.



That’s the claim of a study carried out by the Institute of Education at Plymouth University and The Camping and Caravanning Club, who collaborated to discover perceptions of the relationship between education and camping.

Parents and children around the UK were asked a series of questions which looked at the educational, psychological and social benefits of the camping experience to children of all ages.

The research led by Sue Waite, Associate Professor at the Plymouth Institute of Education, found that more than 4 out of 5 parents thought camping had a positive effect on their children’s school education.

It showed that 98% of parents said camping makes their kids appreciate and connect with nature; 95% said their kids were happier when camping; and 93% felt that it provided useful skills for later life.

Some parents (15%) reported that escaping technology (laptops, tablets, mobiles, etc) is a good thing for their children and one of the benefits of camping. A fifth of parents (20%) said camping gives their kids freedom, independence and confidence; and more than two thirds (68%) felt camping helped their children to enjoy learning in the classroom, because they can share their camping adventures and experiences such as visiting exciting educational or historical sites.

Sue Waite said; “Interestingly, the parents surveyed believed camping supported the key curriculum subjects of Geography, History and Science and actually, that stacks up because the most common camping activities were natural – such as rock pooling and nature walks – where children were getting to understand ecosystems and identify lifeforms, respecting nature and the environment.”

The link between education and camping is the focus of a new campaign, ‘Get Kids Camping’, which was launched on 21st May 2015 by Julia Bradbury, The Camping and Caravanning Club President.

You can download the complete research report here - you'll need a PDF reader to view it.

  Comments on this article from our visitors

    Message posted by Webmaster on 29/05/2015 18:56:48Report Post Report this
What do you think? Is there anything in this?
 Reply

    Message posted by jeffersskate on 29/05/2015 20:57:27Report Post Report this
Hmmmm, Im not sure really- if its the article from the Plymouth herald? Ive seen it - I think my children definitely benefit from it it sooo many ways. They love it too. I think that more children should be taken out side more often and taught how to be active and fit and appreciate outdoor life. I also think that camping and being sufficient without being at home is a good skill to learn. However, although I believe it has numerous benefits to it I cant see Ive seen any benefits for them at school to be honest. Maybe in their future life the benefits will show ie being more tenacious. I hope so. I do fee bad for the familys who cant afford to do it, or who cant for various health reasons, this article may make them feel more guilty than they already do. I know its hard for us to afford camping and if we couldn't I'd so very much feel I'd let the children down. We also have an autistic boy who luckily enough is 'at one with nature' (as many autistic children are) but this is another reason we don't go to very busy sites as he gets really bothered by load noises and starts pulling at his hair and ears and either has 'abscences' or flees, both of which are dangerous :(
 Reply

    Message posted by Eskymew on 29/05/2015 21:48:51Report Post Report this
Maybe the kind of parents that value camping and the outdoors also value other things (like bed times and restricting screen time). It may not be the camping but the type of families that do it. That said, I'll take any extra help with their educations.
 Reply

    Message posted by ladycake on 29/05/2015 21:53:11Report Post Report this
ds (autistic) also benefits from camping. he`s obsessed with his tablet etc and it helps get him off it!!
 Reply

    Message posted by tentadventurer on 29/05/2015 23:20:47Report Post Report this
I second Eskymew on this... as a Learning support assistant in a primary school, having not really thought about it before i can now think of 3 main groups... High Fliers - have been to the likes of the USA, Mexico, Egypt etc by the age of 10. Very sure of themselves and braggers. Professional parents. Do every extra curricular lesson going BUT due to their "know it all" attitude, don't really flourish as you would expect. Sun £9.50ers - no rules or routine at home which leads to lack of respect at school, never do homework, always on time out. Can tell you the time and how much change from a tenner they should be getting because they're streetwise. Campers - The happy medium? Good attendance, useless at maths and time telling because the parents don't let them wander the streets but full of imagination. Can write amazing visual descriptions. Know and understand the fundamentals of politeness. Turn-takers and sharers. Happy to play outside instead of sit on an xbox all day. Almost certainly it's about the "type" that camp rather than the effects of camping.
 Reply

    Message posted by Kuppenbender on 30/05/2015 08:31:29Report Post Report this
Mine does
 Reply

    Message posted by jelboy53 on 30/05/2015 08:37:09Report Post Report this
I don't know if me taking them camping aided their educational growth....But what I do know is they have grown into "Well Rounded" young adults with few of the problems that beset some of those who never managed to escape the urban sprawl from time to time... Yes of course they still have the challenges of everyday life to face(As we all do) But so far they seem to be coping rather well... Other factors...Such as upbringing have played their part in this.... I am of course biased when it comes talking about them (As any parent is)But they seem to be doing ok... Their adventures in the wide open spaces of Britain must surely have had an influence on who they are today... Jelboy.
 Reply

    Message posted by VangoMan02 on 30/05/2015 08:54:21Report Post Report this
I would say that I believe children who are involved in the great outdoors..including camping from a young age. Are more likely to grow up thoughful and caring individuals about most things throughout their life. I am of course bias but see this in my own children who are now adults. I also see it in my friends children who had a similar appreciation of the outdoors. I am also sure we have all seen or know children on our travels that are the same. Post last edited on 30/05/2015 10:01:12Post last edited on 30/05/2015 11:14:01
 Reply

    Message posted by Billy x on 30/05/2015 10:40:02Report Post Report this
Is camping good for kids? Yes obviously it is. Do kids who go camping do better at school? Are they more happy & healthy? Probably, but(as mentioned)I would guess it's not because they go camping, but because their parents are more likely to be middle class with more disposable income. I notice French schools seem to organise camping trips, you will often see rows of identical tents at a camping municipal with kids doing organised activities. This could well give kids whoes parents could not otherwise afford a holiday a chance to go camping. So if camping is so good for kids then perhaps UK schools should organise such trips, or perhaps some do already? I don't know how popular The Scouts are these days but I recall I really enjoyed my camping trips with them when I was a kid in the early 60s. It can't have cost much because my mum was a single parent with not much income.
 Reply

    Message posted by Katieep on 30/05/2015 20:16:30Report Post Report this
Quote: Originally posted by tentadventurer on 29/5/2015
I second Eskymew on this... as a Learning support assistant in a primary school, having not really thought about it before i can now think of 3 main groups... High Fliers - have been to the likes of the USA, Mexico, Egypt etc by the age of 10. Very sure of themselves and braggers. Professional parents. Do every extra curricular lesson going BUT due to their "know it all" attitude, don't really flourish as you would expect. Sun £9.50ers - no rules or routine at home which leads to lack of respect at school, never do homework, always on time out. Can tell you the time and how much change from a tenner they should be getting because they're streetwise. Campers - The happy medium? Good attendance, useless at maths and time telling because the parents don't let them wander the streets but full of imagination. Can write amazing visual descriptions. Know and understand the fundamentals of politeness. Turn-takers and sharers. Happy to play outside instead of sit on an xbox all day. Almost certainly it's about the "type" that camp rather than the effects of camping.
Goodness if I thought for one minute camping would have a negative impact on my girls ability to do maths we wouldnt be going any more.
 Reply

    Message posted by tentadventurer on 30/05/2015 20:57:39Report Post Report this
Lol katieep, it's not the camping, it's the upbringing. Obviously this is a generalisation but i believe regular camping families are more proactive with their children's behaviour and supervision. The maths they can do is school maths rather than being picked up through experience and a need to geg by independently.
 Reply

    Message posted by Mucker1884 on 31/05/2015 06:41:26Report Post Report this
I believe the children are our future. Teach them well and let them lead the way. Show them all the beauty they possess inside. Give them a sense of pride to make it easier. Let the children's laughter remind us how we used to be. Just my opinion, of course.
 Reply

    Message posted by JoMarch on 31/05/2015 08:44:09Report Post Report this
Quote: Originally posted by Mucker1884 on 31/5/2015
I believe the children are our future. Teach them well and let them lead the way. Show them all the beauty they possess inside. Give them a sense of pride to make it easier. Let the children's laughter remind us how we used to be. Just my opinion, of course.
"Damn that boy's good. Let's hear it for Sexual Chocolate ladies and gentlemen."
 Reply

    Message posted by mitchells fam on 31/05/2015 13:56:47Report Post Report this
Quote: Originally posted by Katieep on 30/5/2015
Quote: Originally posted by tentadventurer on 29/5/2015I second Eskymew on this... as a Learning support assistant in a primary school, having not really thought about it before i can now think of 3 main groups...
High Fliers - have been to the likes of the USA, Mexico, Egypt etc by the age of 10. Very sure of themselves and braggers. Professional parents. Do every extra curricular lesson going BUT due to their "know it all" attitude, don't really flourish as you would expect. Sun £9.50ers - no rules or routine at home which leads to lack of respect at school, never do homework, always on time out. Can tell you the time and how much change from a tenner they should be getting because they're streetwise. Campers - The happy medium? Good attendance, useless at maths and time telling because the parents don't let them wander the streets but full of imagination. Can write amazing visual descriptions. Know and understand the fundamentals of politeness. Turn-takers and sharers. Happy to play outside instead of sit on an xbox all day. Almost certainly it's about the "type" that camp rather than the effects of camping.
Goodness if I thought for one minute camping would have a negative impact on my girls ability to do maths we wouldnt be going any more.
ouch! bit too generalised a description for me, outdoor play /learning has decreased with media attention so parents do let them play out as much, leading to a decrease in play based, child initatiated play based on the childs own risk assessements (IF WE TIE THIS ROPE TO THIS TREE CAN WE SWING ACROSS WITHOUT BREAKING OUR LEGS? LOL) campers kids are more exposed to outdoor play using brain power, rather than electronic therefore develop more learning, assessment, teamwork skills, etc etc
 Reply

    Message posted by Old Smokey on 31/05/2015 13:58:24Report Post Report this
Great article. More about perceptions than research on educational benefits, but useful in gauging parental opinion on educational elements of camping. It's fair to say I'm quite passionate about the educational benefits of the outdoors, I teach primary & have lead outdoor ed programs for many years. I also try & provide as much natural play and outdoor experiences for my own children. The social, emotional and cognitive benefits of free play should not be underestimated. Whilst obvious links to geography & science can be made from being outdoors, many of the skills & attitudes required as pre-requisites to successful learning in and out of the classroom (well being, creativity, resilience, concentration, tolerance, empathy, stamina etc) are developed through free play and imaginative interaction in natural environments. And as summed up at the end, provide fun, new exciting experiences!! A wiser man than me once told me children won't remember what you made them think about, but they will remember how you made them feel. Those feelings will guide their decision making long after they have forgotten you!! A connection with nature and the natural world is essential factor for many in maintaining sound mental health, dealing with stress and taking time out from busy schedules to reflect and take perspective on life. Very useful life-skills that an be learned just from spending quality time outdoors. A wiser man again once said, 'Let nature be your teacher' William Wordsworth
 Reply

    Message posted by oldham on 31/05/2015 14:17:31Report Post Report this
Desiderata
 Reply

    Message posted by navver on 31/05/2015 16:28:37Report Post Report this
For me it's all about roughing it an all pitching in together. So many kids now have everything on a plate they just don't appreciate what they have. Humans only thrived because they worked together. People actually enjoy working together such as putting the tent up, changing the water etc. That is a valuable lesson in life.
 Reply

    Message posted by Katieep on 31/05/2015 18:46:26Report Post Report this
My children's local guide group voted to go to Edinburgh last year - good choice as it gave the la'al country bumpkins a chance to experience a bit of the city on their own but in a controlled manner. They're back at their local guide camp in Ennerdale this year The grass is always greener ............. I also have to say Im impressed that all your kids are such little angels when camping - helping out, sharing, etc Mine sit in the car until the last possible moment and when the tent is pitched out they get into an inflatable chair, kindles on and noses stuck into books. They will do the washing-up but only under protracted negotiation. I have a feeling that the whole campsite heard my 'discussion' the other night with one of the girls on the need to shower so she doesn't stink out the tent. This 'discussion' included her reasoning that it wasn't 'nice' to use a shower that lots of other people had used and that when she is older she is not, I repeat not going to go camping so she doesn't have to use campsite showers!
 Reply

    Message posted by HappyCamper1971 on 02/06/2015 22:33:50Report Post Report this
Quote: Originally posted by Billy x on 30/5/2015
Is camping good for kids? Yes obviously it is. Do kids who go camping do better at school? Are they more happy & healthy? Probably, but(as mentioned)I would guess it's not because they go camping, but because their parents are more likely to be middle class with more disposable income. I notice French schools seem to organise camping trips, you will often see rows of identical tents at a camping municipal with kids doing organised activities. This could well give kids whoes parents could not otherwise afford a holiday a chance to go camping. So if camping is so good for kids then perhaps UK schools should organise such trips, or perhaps some do already? I don't know how popular The Scouts are these days but I recall I really enjoyed my camping trips with them when I was a kid in the early 60s. It can't have cost much because my mum was a single parent with not much income.
As a Scouting Member, of a group with at least 50 members, I can confirm that our group LOVE to go camping - recent trip April 10 - 12. Scouting is taking a step back to the basics and camping is a huge part of that - and long may it continue!! Camping gives children the chance to be children - running around, getting dirty and having endless hours of fun doing things that they normally don't do. As a family we have camped, caravaned and stayed in hotels but nothing beats the feeling of freedom of camping. Hearing nature as it was intended just can't be put into words and from a personal point I love to hear other people's children giggling when you know for a fact they're doing something they shouldn't be.
 Reply

    Message posted by Chizzi on 05/06/2015 18:21:53Report Post Report this
We turned to camping because we couldn't afford fancy hotels or holidays abroad...so I wouldn't class camping as a luxury. However, any holiday is as cheap or as expensive as you make it. Nowadays the money we save can be spent on taking the kids places and trying new activities. Camping holidays make us all work together as a team and it's fun, not a chore. Our girls do well at school and are what I call resilient - they still get bullied, but are able to deal with it better because they have a stable family background not because they've camped under canvas!
 Reply

    Message posted by LlewB on 10/06/2015 20:50:04Report Post Report this
Personally I think it does have benefits, and this article certainly justifies us taking the kids out into the (relative) wild on holiday. However, from the article it seems to be based on parents opinions and doesn't mention cross referencing with pupils results or anything. Lazy science, even if I agree with the outcome :-)
 Reply


 Leave your own comment on this article to let everyone know what you think



Index : General Articles : Do Camping Kids do Better at School? - by UKCampsite.co.uk



7574 Visitors online !

Free UKCampsite.co.uk Window Sticker  -  Recommend to Friend  -  Pensions Auto-enrolment

[Message Forums]  [Caravan Sites & Camping]  [Company Listings]  [Features / Advice]  [Virtual Brochure]  [Shop!]
[Reception]  [Competitions]  [Caravans & Motorhomes For Sale]  [Event Diary]  [Contact Us]  [Tent Reviews

Please note we are not responsible for the content of external sites & any reviews represent the author's personal view only. Please report any error here. You may view our privacy and cookie policy here. All copyrights & other intellectual property rights in the design and content of this web site are reserved to the UKCampsite.co.uk © 1999 - 2017