Home

   Log in or Register



Insurance Quotes
forums Campsite Search Comp Directory tips virtual brochure Profile
Tent and Awning Reviews Competitions Caravans and Motorhomes For Sale Shopping Diary Contact Us

Advertisement

Message Forums

Welcome Guest Register Login Search The Forum Posts Since Last Visit
 Reception - All Forums
   Caravans and Caravanning -  Caravan Towcars and Towing Advice
Share   Tweet This!  Share on Facebook  Email  Printer Friendly Version Print
Subject Topic: Are electric cars the future
Page:  1  ....  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21 Post Reply Post New Topic
Message posted by Colin2105/1/2022 at 6:28pm
Outfit:  1992 Elddis Wisp 450CT + X Trail     Location:  East Herts
Joined: 05/11/2013
View Colin21's Profile View Profile   Reply to Colin21 Reply   Quote Colin21 Quote  
Colin21
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   5245

Site Reviews Total: 14
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 2  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 2  
Site Reviews 2018: 3  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 18
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 21
Site Nights 2018: 18

Quote: Originally posted by boff on 05/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by Colin21 on 04/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by saxo1 on 04/1/2022
There are several new battery technologies already being developed that according to the developers will revolutionise the energy density of batteries.
saxo1



Let us hope they are right then, but considering the past 60 years or so I have my doubts. Still, stranger things have happened.



The implication that nothing has changed in 60 years regarding battery technology, not just in reference to cars.   Is completely ridiculous, just look around you.




Of course there have been advances in battery technology over the past 60 years, but if anyone regards them as "significant advances" that, in my opinion, means that it makes it even less likely that further significant advances can be made. My question would be just how much more energy can be stored in a battery than can be stored today? I personally think very little, but then I freely admit that I am no expert and it is only my opinion. I will be delighted if I am proved wrong.


-------------
Best Regards,
Colin

Message posted by saxo105/1/2022 at 6:52pm
Outfit:       Location:  
Joined: 29/10/2005
View saxo1's Profile View Profile   Reply to saxo1 Reply   Quote saxo1 Quote  
saxo1
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   4184

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

LOL, the average doesn't mean a lot though. I drive 18,000+ per year in a
30 year old Land Rover I imagine that most people drive more than that but I imagine the the average is skewed by the number of people who only drive their car once or twice a week.


The average mileage quoted by drivers for insurance purposes is between 7000 and 8000 miles pa, if you were correct in your assumption that most people drive more than 18000 miles pa there are a lot of people driving without insurance.
If you knowingly underestimate your mileage when filling out your application in the event of a claim the ins co can invalidate the policy.
saxo1


Message posted by saxo1 via mobile 05/1/2022 at 8:03pm
Outfit:       Location:  
Joined: 29/10/2005
View saxo1's Profile View Profile   Reply to saxo1 Reply   Quote saxo1 Quote  
saxo1
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   4184

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

No new battery developments?
The latest Mercedes will be powered by a battery that is 50 % smaller and 30% lighter but will deliver the same power as is used today!
Saxo1

Message posted by Derbian via mobile 05/1/2022 at 10:19pm
Outfit:  Seat Exeo Opus Camper     Location:  derbyshire
Joined: 18/2/2016
View Derbian's Profile View Profile   Reply to Derbian Reply   Quote Derbian Quote  
Derbian
Avatar
Standard Member
Standard Member

Forum Posts:   94

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

As said averages can be very misleading. Some weeks I probably cover less than 40 miles but if I visit my mother in law I can do 250 miles in the day and if I visit relatives in Scotland as I usually do at christmas I can do 1000 miles in the week.

Message posted by tdrees via mobile 05/1/2022 at 10:49pm
Outfit:  Bailey Unicorn S3 Vigo + Polestar 2     Location:  Northamptonshire
Joined: 28/4/2009
View tdrees's Profile View Profile   Reply to tdrees Reply   Quote tdrees Quote  
tdrees
Avatar
Silver Member
Silver Member

Forum Posts:   138

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0


Quote: Originally posted by Colin21 on 04/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by saxo1 on 04/1/2022
When the Nissan leaf was introduced in 2010 I expect a lot of people didn't envisage the BEV being accepted as as mainstream form o transport.
The batteries are an integral part of the tractors/cranes etc they aren't an additional load, with tractors they replace the ballast weights that are used.They are no different than the modern battery cars.
The development of heavy plant battery use is in it's infancy but when you consider the rapid increase in the Battery car market it won't be too far in the future,there is already a market for the smaller tractors that are on sale.
saxo1




I don't regard BEVs as anything like mainstream yet as they still only make up a tiny percentage of the overall car numbers. I admit they are gaining ground though.

I remember seeing those battery-powered tractors, I think it may have been on Countryfile, and they did seem good. Probably a near-equivalent of the little grey "fergies" that were once commonplace.

I don't think battery development is anything like as rapid as the rest of BEV development though. I worked in the battery charging industry back in the 1960s and although there has been some advance I wouldn't describe it as massive, and we are talking about a nearly 60 year time span. I would have thought by now that if it were possible we would have had batteries that would power a vehicle for 400 miles but which were no bigger than an ordinary car battery. I often wonder if such is actually physically possible. Can that much electrical energy be stored in such a small space as energy from petrol is stored, or is it simply not possible?




Interesting episode of fully charged here that deals with battery technology over time, a battery replacement and a full battery tractor.

As for BEV being mainstream or not, in Dec 2021 they represented 26% of all new registrations. Tesla alone were 9%, more than any other manufacturer.



Advertisement


Message posted by saxo1 via mobile 05/1/2022 at 10:56pm
Outfit:       Location:  
Joined: 29/10/2005
View saxo1's Profile View Profile   Reply to saxo1 Reply   Quote saxo1 Quote  
saxo1
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   4184

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

The new b!ade technology developed by BYD batteries can increase capacity by 30% in the same volume as conventional batteries.
Saxo1




Message posted by bessie500 via mobile 06/1/2022 at 12:09am
Outfit:  Ford Kuga Coachman Pastiche 575     Location:  Lancashire
Joined: 11/9/2006
View bessie500's Profile View Profile   Reply to bessie500 Reply   Quote bessie500 Quote  
bessie500
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   2008

Site Reviews Total: 2
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 2  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 11
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Quote: Originally posted by tdrees on 05/1/2022

Quote: Originally posted by Colin21 on 04/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by saxo1 on 04/1/2022
When the Nissan leaf was introduced in 2010 I expect a lot of people didn't envisage the BEV being accepted as as mainstream form o transport.
The batteries are an integral part of the tractors/cranes etc they aren't an additional load, with tractors they replace the ballast weights that are used.They are no different than the modern battery cars.
The development of heavy plant battery use is in it's infancy but when you consider the rapid increase in the Battery car market it won't be too far in the future,there is already a market for the smaller tractors that are on sale.
saxo1




I don't regard BEVs as anything like mainstream yet as they still only make up a tiny percentage of the overall car numbers. I admit they are gaining ground though.

I remember seeing those battery-powered tractors, I think it may have been on Countryfile, and they did seem good. Probably a near-equivalent of the little grey "fergies" that were once commonplace.

I don't think battery development is anything like as rapid as the rest of BEV development though. I worked in the battery charging industry back in the 1960s and although there has been some advance I wouldn't describe it as massive, and we are talking about a nearly 60 year time span. I would have thought by now that if it were possible we would have had batteries that would power a vehicle for 400 miles but which were no bigger than an ordinary car battery. I often wonder if such is actually physically possible. Can that much electrical energy be stored in such a small space as energy from petrol is stored, or is it simply not possible?




Interesting episode of fully charged here that deals with battery technology over time, a battery replacement and a full battery tractor.

As for BEV being mainstream or not, in Dec 2021 they represented 26% of all new registrations. Tesla alone were 9%, more than any other manufacturer.






I suspect that is because you can actually get a Tesla the waiting list before Christmas was 6 to 8 weeks, unlike other car manufacturers which Is 6 months onwards.

Bessie

Message posted by tdrees via mobile 06/1/2022 at 8:13am
Outfit:  Bailey Unicorn S3 Vigo + Polestar 2     Location:  Northamptonshire
Joined: 28/4/2009
View tdrees's Profile View Profile   Reply to tdrees Reply   Quote tdrees Quote  
tdrees
Avatar
Silver Member
Silver Member

Forum Posts:   138

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Quote: Originally posted by bessie500 on 06/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by tdrees on 05/1/2022

Quote: Originally posted by Colin21 on 04/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by saxo1 on 04/1/2022
When the Nissan leaf was introduced in 2010 I expect a lot of people didn't envisage the BEV being accepted as as mainstream form o transport.
The batteries are an integral part of the tractors/cranes etc they aren't an additional load, with tractors they replace the ballast weights that are used.They are no different than the modern battery cars.
The development of heavy plant battery use is in it's infancy but when you consider the rapid increase in the Battery car market it won't be too far in the future,there is already a market for the smaller tractors that are on sale.
saxo1




I don't regard BEVs as anything like mainstream yet as they still only make up a tiny percentage of the overall car numbers. I admit they are gaining ground though.

I remember seeing those battery-powered tractors, I think it may have been on Countryfile, and they did seem good. Probably a near-equivalent of the little grey "fergies" that were once commonplace.

I don't think battery development is anything like as rapid as the rest of BEV development though. I worked in the battery charging industry back in the 1960s and although there has been some advance I wouldn't describe it as massive, and we are talking about a nearly 60 year time span. I would have thought by now that if it were possible we would have had batteries that would power a vehicle for 400 miles but which were no bigger than an ordinary car battery. I often wonder if such is actually physically possible. Can that much electrical energy be stored in such a small space as energy from petrol is stored, or is it simply not possible?




Interesting episode of fully charged here that deals with battery technology over time, a battery replacement and a full battery tractor.

As for BEV being mainstream or not, in Dec 2021 they represented 26% of all new registrations. Tesla alone were 9%, more than any other manufacturer.






I suspect that is because you can actually get a Tesla the waiting list before Christmas was 6 to 8 weeks, unlike other car manufacturers which Is 6 months onwards.

Bessie




That may be the case Bessie, but they are being bought. If people didnít want them the sales would not be there at all. Also worth nothing that VW sold half as many pure EV as petrol, and as many as BMW sold petrol.

I think the idea that BEV new sales are not mainstream is no longer correct.

Message posted by boff06/1/2022 at 10:22am
Outfit:  Hymer Nova 590GL     Location:  N Wales
Joined: 13/2/2005
View boff's Profile View Profile   Reply to boff Reply   Quote boff Quote  
boff
Avatar
Platinum Member
Platinum Member

Forum Posts:   528

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Quote: Originally posted by tdrees on 06/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by bessie500 on 06/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by tdrees on 05/1/2022

Quote: Originally posted by Colin21 on 04/1/2022
Quote: Originally posted by saxo1 on 04/1/2022
When the Nissan leaf was introduced in 2010 I expect a lot of people didn't envisage the BEV being accepted as as mainstream form o transport.
The batteries are an integral part of the tractors/cranes etc they aren't an additional load, with tractors they replace the ballast weights that are used.They are no different than the modern battery cars.
The development of heavy plant battery use is in it's infancy but when you consider the rapid increase in the Battery car market it won't be too far in the future,there is already a market for the smaller tractors that are on sale.
saxo1




I don't regard BEVs as anything like mainstream yet as they still only make up a tiny percentage of the overall car numbers. I admit they are gaining ground though.

I remember seeing those battery-powered tractors, I think it may have been on Countryfile, and they did seem good. Probably a near-equivalent of the little grey "fergies" that were once commonplace.

I don't think battery development is anything like as rapid as the rest of BEV development though. I worked in the battery charging industry back in the 1960s and although there has been some advance I wouldn't describe it as massive, and we are talking about a nearly 60 year time span. I would have thought by now that if it were possible we would have had batteries that would power a vehicle for 400 miles but which were no bigger than an ordinary car battery. I often wonder if such is actually physically possible. Can that much electrical energy be stored in such a small space as energy from petrol is stored, or is it simply not possible?




Interesting episode of fully charged here that deals with battery technology over time, a battery replacement and a full battery tractor.

As for BEV being mainstream or not, in Dec 2021 they represented 26% of all new registrations. Tesla alone were 9%, more than any other manufacturer.






I suspect that is because you can actually get a Tesla the waiting list before Christmas was 6 to 8 weeks, unlike other car manufacturers which Is 6 months onwards.

Bessie




That may be the case Bessie, but they are being bought. If people didnít want them the sales would not be there at all. Also worth nothing that VW sold half as many pure EV as petrol, and as many as BMW sold petrol.

I think the idea that BEV new sales are not mainstream is no longer correct.



I think everyone is missing. Is the massive increase in Diesel sales. In Nov it was 5% Dec 7% that is a 40% increase😂😂😂

More seriously if 5 years ago Diesel was approximately 50% of the market.   This has been replaced by the proportion, of pure EVís and Hybrids, are of the total sales today

Message posted by saxo106/1/2022 at 10:30am
Outfit:       Location:  
Joined: 29/10/2005
View saxo1's Profile View Profile   Reply to saxo1 Reply   Quote saxo1 Quote  
saxo1
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   4184

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

qUOTE "Can that much electrical energy be stored in such a small space as energy from petrol is stored, or is it simply not possible?

80% of the potential energy in a BEV battery is used to drive the vehicle it is stored in the battery and needs no other transformation.
The potential energy in petrol,in order to be used,has to be combined with oxygen and ignited to release the energy, only between 25% and 30% of this energy is used to propel the car on the road heat loss accounts for the majority of the energy released.
In terms of volume petrol needs to be transformed into heat which requires a mechanical device (the engine) and a petrol storage tank, a battery performs all this in the one combined unit.
saxo1

Advertisement


Message posted by Colin2106/1/2022 at 10:33am
Outfit:  1992 Elddis Wisp 450CT + X Trail     Location:  East Herts
Joined: 05/11/2013
View Colin21's Profile View Profile   Reply to Colin21 Reply   Quote Colin21 Quote  
Colin21
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   5245

Site Reviews Total: 14
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 2  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 2  
Site Reviews 2018: 3  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 18
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 21
Site Nights 2018: 18

We are not comparing like for like though. It's not really so much what is being bought, it's more about what's on the road. Sales of new BEVs may well be up as a proportion of new cars being sold, but the vast majority of car sales are in the second-hand market.

If the government's plans actually happen, you won't be able to buy a new ICE car in Britain in a few years time, but that's a big IF. IF it happens then 100% of car sales will be EVs. Then there is the question as to whether people will still be able to buy ICE cars abroad and import them. If they can I suspect quite a few will.

Whatever happens with the government's plans I suspect it will still be the case that the vast majority of cars on the road will be ICEs. If looked after, cars today can easily last 20 years, unlike those from the 1960s that were usually complete rust-buckets in 10 years. Cars being built today will easily outlast me.



-------------
Best Regards,
Colin

Message posted by tdrees06/1/2022 at 11:04am
Outfit:  Bailey Unicorn S3 Vigo + Polestar 2     Location:  Northamptonshire
Joined: 28/4/2009
View tdrees's Profile View Profile   Reply to tdrees Reply   Quote tdrees Quote  
tdrees
Avatar
Silver Member
Silver Member

Forum Posts:   138

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Quote: Originally posted by boff on 06/1/2022

I think everyone is missing. Is the massive increase in Diesel sales. In Nov it was 5% Dec 7% that is a 40% increase😂😂😂

More seriously if 5 years ago Diesel was approximately 50% of the market.   This has been replaced by the proportion, of pure EVís and Hybrids, are of the total sales today



Yes - when you put it like that, the last few years have been extraordinary in transition. As useful as diesel engines are, particularly for those who tow, their days (new) are well and truly numbered. And realistically - so are petrol.

It is this sort of thing that makes me think long and hard what to do with my diesel PHEV. It's now very much a second car, and pretty much only gets used in pure EV mode. It's done 160 miles in the last 100 days of which 60 were for servicing and a recall. Replacing it with a small EV would be eminently sensible, or getting rid all together. But if I lost access to my company EV for whatever reason, I would need something that could tow.

Message posted by boff06/1/2022 at 11:30am
Outfit:  Hymer Nova 590GL     Location:  N Wales
Joined: 13/2/2005
View boff's Profile View Profile   Reply to boff Reply   Quote boff Quote  
boff
Avatar
Platinum Member
Platinum Member

Forum Posts:   528

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Presumably these miles have been done in a number of short journey's you can effectively use it as an EV. There is no rational, logical reason to change it.    But since when has the decision to change cars been rational or logical?

Message posted by bessie500 via mobile 06/1/2022 at 11:54am
Outfit:  Ford Kuga Coachman Pastiche 575     Location:  Lancashire
Joined: 11/9/2006
View bessie500's Profile View Profile   Reply to bessie500 Reply   Quote bessie500 Quote  
bessie500
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   2008

Site Reviews Total: 2
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 2  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 11
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

We have well over 100 company cars at our place, I think we literally only have about four diesel cars everybody else is in a hybrid of some description, mainly the BMW330E or the Volvo XC60

Bessie

Message posted by Colin2106/1/2022 at 12:08pm
Outfit:  1992 Elddis Wisp 450CT + X Trail     Location:  East Herts
Joined: 05/11/2013
View Colin21's Profile View Profile   Reply to Colin21 Reply   Quote Colin21 Quote  
Colin21
Avatar
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Forum Posts:   5245

Site Reviews Total: 14
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 2  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 2  
Site Reviews 2018: 3  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 18
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 21
Site Nights 2018: 18

Quote: Originally posted by bessie500 on 06/1/2022
We have well over 100 company cars at our place, I think we literally only have about four diesel cars everybody else is in a hybrid of some description, mainly the BMW330E or the Volvo XC60

Bessie



Company cars often drive the market as I believe companies are the main buyers of new cars. New cars though are only a very small part of the overall car-buying market. I'm not sure what percentage but I feel sure I heard somewhere that is less than 10%.


-------------
Best Regards,
Colin

Message posted by tdrees06/1/2022 at 12:46pm
Outfit:  Bailey Unicorn S3 Vigo + Polestar 2     Location:  Northamptonshire
Joined: 28/4/2009
View tdrees's Profile View Profile   Reply to tdrees Reply   Quote tdrees Quote  
tdrees
Avatar
Silver Member
Silver Member

Forum Posts:   138

Site Reviews Total: 0
Site Reviews 2022: 0  
Site Reviews 2021: 0  
Site Reviews 2020: 0  
Site Reviews 2019: 0  
Site Reviews 2018: 0  
Site Nights 2022: 0
Site Nights 2021: 0
Site Nights 2020: 0
Site Nights 2019: 0
Site Nights 2018: 0

Quote: Originally posted by boff on 06/1/2022
Presumably these miles have been done in a number of short journey's you can effectively use it as an EV. There is no rational, logical reason to change it. But since when has the decision to change cars been rational or logical?



Yes - exactly that. Mostly short journeys of just a few miles, and really only 3 longer ones. The short ones are entirely in EV mode only, always charged over night. A full EV would suit that role much better. But - as the children are growing up and leaving home, we have less use for 2 bigger cars. The desire to have something "fun" that can also be the run around when needed is surfacing. If only there were an all electric MX-5 convertible or mini cooper convertible. About the closest you can get today is the Fiat 500e convertible, but it's silly money compared to what else is out there.



In order to post a reply you will need to register, or if already registered please log in here

  Prev      Next

Jump To Page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21

Quick Links - All Forums - Caravan Towcars and Towing Advice - Top of Page

Printer Friendly Version Printable version      Share   Tweet This!  Share on Facebook  Email


Latest News, Discounts and Competitions  see all...





3587 Visitors online !

Free UKCampsite.co.uk Window Sticker  -  Recommend to Friend

[Message Forums]  [Caravan Sites & Camping]  [Company Listings]  [Features / Advice]  [Virtual Brochure]  [Shop!]
[Reception]  [Competitions]  [Caravans & Motorhomes For Sale]  [Event Diary]  [Contact Us]  [Tent Reviews



Please note we are not responsible for the content of external sites & any reviews represent the author's personal view only. Please report any error here. You may view our privacy and cookie policy and terms and conditions here. All copyrights & other intellectual property rights in the design and content of this web site are reserved to the UKCampsite.co.uk © 1999 - 2022


Advertisement


Advertisement